Forty Years Ago…

Edition: December 2002 - Vol 10 Number 12
Article#: 1411
Author: Repertoire

Hemoccult in new lab size

Hemoccult, the diagnostic aid for determining occult blood in body fluids, recently introduced by the Pharmaceutical Laboratories Division of Schieffelin & Co., became available in a special larger laboratory size. The new package could be used for a minimum of 300 tests.



New EGG electrode

Verona, WI-based Alloyd Engineering Laboratory introduced the Allotrode electrode. The electrode used a liquid electrolyte furnished in a plastic squeeze bottle. The built-in reservoir fed electrolyte through its porous metal base, thereby providing “excellent skin contact”. Pads, pastes, maintenance and cleanups are eliminated, according to the manufacturer.



Now with Velcro!

W.A. Baum Co. of Copiague, NY, introduced its Air-Lok Cuff with Velcro, the new fabric fastener. The manufacturer stated that it had subjected the new cuff to thorough factory inspections and extensive field tests over a period of six months.



Statistical survey shows tough market

Total sales of 113 companies that participated in the ASTA Statistical Survey climbed from $95 million in 1956 to $117 million in 1959. The survey also showed that in 1956, profit on sales was 0.86 percent of the sales dollar; in 1957, it jumped to 1.13, and in 1958, up to 1.16. But in 1959, it dropped to 0.76. Meanwhile, sales reps’ salaries, commissions and expenses dropped from 7.03 percent of net sales in 1956 to 6.57 in 1957, 6.37 in 1958 and 6.27 in 1959. Inventory turns increased from 4.9 times per year in 1956 to 5.4 in 1959.



People News

Died: Fred Farris, 30-year inside and outside sales rep for Goetze-Niemer Co., Kansas City. Farris had served in the 35th Division during World War I, and was in the artillery battery commanded by Captain (later President) Harry Truman. Died: David Bellamy, a vice president of the Wilmot Castle Co., who had been with the company 36 years. His father, Francis Bellamy, was the author of the “Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.” Died: Dr. Ralph Falk, 76, founder and board chairman of Baxter Laboratories, Morton Grove, IL, and a pioneer in the development of intravenous feeding. Married: Patricia Koley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Koley of the Professional Supply Co., Omaha, NE, to Thomas Walz.



Company News

A.S. Aloe Co. held the first in a series of four national sales meetings. A total of 325 Aloe sales reps, division managers and executives were slated to attend the sessions. IPCO Hospital Supply Co. and Surgical Selling Companies of Atlanta, Houston and Bluefield, WV, were scheduled to merge Jan. 2, 1961. Hertz Corp., national car and truck rental and leasing company, formed a company to rent hospital and sickroom equipment, as well as party supplies, TV sets and other merchandise, to the general public. Included were hospital beds, commodes, overhead fracture frames, walkers, wheelchairs, patient lifts, etc.



Disposables are infection risk

Two authorities on sterilization warned a group of central supply personnel that disposable tubing and hypodermic equipment may be a health hazard. Dr. John Brewer, director of biological research for Hynson, Westcott & Dunning (Baltimore), and Theodore J. Carski, president of Baltimore Biological Laboratories, an affiliate of Becton, Dickinson and Co., conceded that disposables save time and eliminate cross-infection, but warned that they may have been produced by manufacturers who lacked prior experience in meeting “the rigid standards required for hospital equipment.”



Source: December 1960 ASTA Journal. ASTA was the American Surgical Trade Association. Its name was later changed to HIDA.